The following quotes are from some of the readers who have been kind enough to e-mail Jim with their comments on The Ghosts of Hopewell:


Just wanted to drop you a line and tell you how much I enjoyed your book on the Lindbergh Case. I recently read Walker's Kidnap and walked away from that thinking that the evidence against Hauptmann was quite strong. But, when I put his name in a web search engine, of course I hit a bunch of conspiracy theory sites. One more level-headed site mentioned your book, which I tracked down through half.com. Congrats on a fine piece of work that sets the record straight.

Rob Boston
2003

. . . The Lindbergh case was a major event in establishing the importance of Forensic Document Examination in the legal system. Several revisionist historians have taken the opportunity to ridicule and demean all of the forensic work done in the Lindbergh case, including the handwriting identifications. Your book (The Ghosts of Hopewell) did an excellent job of discrediting those allegations of error. . . .

A. Frank Hicks
Forensic Document Examiner
2003

I really enjoyed your two books on the [Lindbergh] case. After reading the first I visited the Lindbergh home at Hopewell, the NJSP Museum and the courthouse in Flemington. I am a trial lawyer and have prosecuted and defended many criminal cases. I was the elected state's attorney in a Maryland county for twenty years. I am now a United Nations international prosecutor in Kosovo.

Tom Hickman
2004

I read both of your books on the Lindbergh case, and loved them. I have attempted unsuccessfully to obtain a copy of the FBI statement taken from James B. Russell in 1934 that is twelve pages in length that you referenced in your book. . . .

Robert W. Barnd
2004

Just finished your book, The Ghosts of Hopewell. Up until I read your book I was convinced Hauptmann was innocent. But I have one problem with your book; if Hauptmann did it, where is the rest of the ransom money?

William Walters
2004

I very much enjoyed both of your books about the Lindbergh kidnapping and aftermath. While I don't completely agree with all of your conclusions, you have written the clearest accounts ever published about this crime -- and given the complexity of the case, that's an extraordinary accomplishment.

Colleen Brady
2005

I am an eighth grader at the Out-of-Door Academy in Sarasota, Florida. We are presenting a mock trial in which we, the prosecution, are trying Bruno Hauptmann for first-degree murder in the Lindbergh kidnapping case. The defense is trying to prove it is a conspiracy. We are using your book The Ghosts of Hopewell to get information. . . .

Sarah Olson
2005

I read your books back in 2001 and really enjoyed them. . . . I have a theory about where Hauptmann may have originally hidden the money (and where the box Dr. Condon made may still be). On your advice, I took the "Lindbergh Tour" in the Bronx and found it quite interesting.

Doug Harrell
2005

I have just finished reading both of your books on the Lindbergh kidnapping. . . . I read both of your books very avidly, thoroughly, and painstakingly, both from cover to cover. I truly appreciated your impartiality and unbiased manner in which you explain this case, based on the available evidence and not on pre-conceived ideas.

Joseph Mateus
Calgary, AB Canada
2006

I have been doing a great deal of research on the Lindbergh kidnapping case. I really enjoyed reading your book. . . .

Jim Bahm
History Teacher
Raleigh, NC
2006

I read with a great deal of interest your book on the Lindbergh kidnapping. It is an outstanding publication which I have added to my library.

Donald L. Smith
Retired FBI Agent
FOIA Section
2006

I like the book. . . and can not believe he [Hauptmann] did the whole thing by himself. At first I was on the side that said he did not but your books have me on the other side now.

Bob Milwicz
2006

I just completed your book, The Ghosts of Hopewell. It was exceptional.

Jim Maye
LTC, U.S. Army (Ret.)
2006

Just a short note to tell you how much I enjoyed The Ghosts of Hopewell. Your application of logic and truth -- both rare commodities these days -- to the Lindbergh case made for a refreshing and thoroughly compelling read. It took me until the very last page of the book to understand what you quoted in the beginning: "Nothing is as strong in human beings as the craving to believe in something that is obviously wrong." How true!

Jim Quinlan
2006